HOW TO CARE FOR BOXWOOD

HOW TO CARE FOR BOXWOOD SHRUBS

do you want to know How to care for Boxwood shrub? if yes then you are at the right place because this guide is designed to help you know how to care for Boxwood in your landscape garden.

WHAT IS THE BOXWOOD SHRUB

Boxwood shrubs (also known as Buxus) are closely compacted in substance, evergreen shrubs mostly planted in pleasingly graceful and stylish in appearance or manner, it is also formal landscapes. There are different varieties and varieties of boxwood.

Boxwoods are grown for leaves because their flowers are trivial. Growing boxwood in the landscape of your home allows you to create a formal hedge, a matching border or a pair of boxwood trees to balance the entrance. Box trees can also be planted as a focal point or foundation trees.

BOXWOOD QUICK OVERVIEW

Boxwood best Region:

Boxwood grows well in 6 to 9 for the most part, with a few variations resistant to Zone 4.

Boxwood Height & width:

Boxwood grows from 1 to 20 feet long, 2 to 8 feet wide.

Boxwood Sun Exposure

Boxwood prefer partial or double shade but can tolerate full sun – unless there is a midday sun. Over-exposure to the sun results in burns and runoff. If you are planting in a bright place, look for varieties that are more tolerant to sunlight, such as Maurice Midjet.

Boxwood Flowering time:

Small, insignificant yellow-green flowers bloom in spring.

Boxwood Color and features:

Mainly cultivated for their leaves; Their leaves grow in contrast, almost rounded and leathery to the touch. Many have dark blue-green leaves, while others think they are light green and some have varied leaves.

 Boxwood Toxicity:

Boxwood contains a substance known as an alkaloid which is a toxic most animal such as dogs, cat, horses as well as humans. However it is serve resistant to deer which helps in preventing them from destroying backyard gardening.

RELATED GUIDE: DO DEER EAT BOXWOOD

Coming into Contact with the boxwood can cause skin irritation and the leaves can cause intestinal distress, dizziness, convulsions and respiratory failure.

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT BOXWOOD

With so many sizes, growth rates, and habits, it’s hard to decide which one is better. Here are some suggestions:

For boxwood topiaries and globes, groundcover or rock gardens Dwarf English boxwoods work well because their dense shape and slow growth rate means less pruning and maintenance.

Fast producers are not the best choice for complex top layers because they can grow in size quickly and require constant maintenance. (Staff Selection  Buxus sempervirens North Star, B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ and B. ‘Green Velvet’)

Use hedges and aging that will meet the growing varieties and medium to plant trees at the recommended half distance. (Staff Selection: Box Microfila Sprinter, B Microfila Vero Japonica “Green Beauty” and B Cinica Versus Insularis “Winter Gem”)

For longer spirals and cones, more vigorous plants are used that are naturally conical or column-shaped. (Staff Selection: Buxus ‘Green Mountain’ and B. Green Tower)

For colder regions: Korean boxwoods (B. sinicas var. insularis)  survive well in low temperatures, making them the best choice for cold-weather gardens.

PLANTING OF BOXWOOD

When to Plant Boxwood:

Plant must be done in fall or late winter until early spring.

Where to plant Boxwood:

Different varieties have different requirements, mainly when it comes to exposure and cold hardness, so plant it in a suitable place for that particular strain. One thing they all have in common is that they do not tolerate standing water or compacted soil, so make sure the area is well drained.

The most common problem is tanning – damage to the leaves from excessive exposure to the sun or wind, it turns yellow-orange or reddish brown. To keep them healthy and well, protect them from the winter winds and summer sun and avoid planting in southwestern exposures.

How to plant Boxwood:

The planting hole allows the crown of the tree to sit slightly higher than the ground level. Soil all the ground from water collection to the base to prevent. If they are planted too deep, they can die under pressure.

HOW TO PLANT BOXWOOD IN THE RIGHT LOCATION

Planting boxwood in the right place goes a long way in maintaining healthy plants. Think about the condition of your garden throughout the year. Is your summer hot and dry? Is winter wind or calm? Boxwood works best from whole wood in partial shade.

MUST READ: 

In warmer climates, plants benefit from the midday shade. Boxwood is susceptible to damage from dry winter winds; Plant in a place where it will be safe.

HOW TO GROW BOXWOOD

Plant your boxwood in your dry soil. Before planting, test a soil to make sure your soil is mostly neutral, with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5.

If necessary you can add compost or other modifications as indicated by soil testing before planting.

If you get less than an inch of rain per week, drink plenty of water frequently. You can determine how much rain your garden has received.

These plants do not always require fertilization, but if a soil test determines that your soil is deficient in certain nutrients, you may want to start a regular fertilization program.

There is also a nitrogen deficiency for shaking the leaves of shrubs. If this is the case, you may notice that the lower leaves of your tree have started to turn yellow or have started to leave the bushes prematurely.

You can apply 12-5-9 liquid all-purpose (NPK) fertilizer in early spring and generously around the base of the plant.

BOXWOOD GROWTH ADVICE 

  1. Boxwood must Grow in a moist, well-drained and loamy soil
  2. Apply one to two inches of mulch
  3. Boxwood must Plants to improve regular air circulation

HOW TO WATER BOXWOOD

Overwatering is one of the main causes of root disease, when underwater pressure increases, plants are more susceptible to certain pests what should a gardener do? Water the plants slowly and deeply if needed.

In the first year, newly planted boxwoods will need regular irrigation – weekly or in warmer, drier climates. Year two plants still develop a healthy root system and will continue to need water if there is insufficient rainfall. Once established, boxwood only needs additional irrigation in dry weather.

HOW TO FERTILIZE BOXWOOD

Each soil is different and similarly a garden requires fertilization. Examine a soil to eliminate the task of estimating fertilization. Proper fertilization promotes healthy growth and can reduce pest problems. Boxwood nitrogen or a balanced fertilizer responds well to spring applications where there is a deficiency of phosphorus and potassium.

RECOMMEND READING:

Keep in mind that boxwood has a wide, shallow root system and can be damaged by excessive fertilization. Apply fertilizer across the root zone beyond the crown of the tree. The fertilizer should be prevented from coming in direct contact with the leaves, stems and roots of the tree.

HOW TO PROTECT THE BOXWOOD ROOTS

Boxwood trees have a shallow root system that dries easily. The first step in maintaining a healthy root system is to plant at the right depth. Position the trees so that the main ball sits 1/8 inch above the soil surface. This allows the trees to settle properly without being too deep.

Apply a two to three inch layer of mulch to keep the roots cool and keep the soil moist. Extend the mulch layer at least one foot away from the tree canopy. In autumn and spring, it spreads dead leaves to control germs to maintain good cover and to relatively replenish holes.

HOW TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE DRANAGE FOR BOXWOOD

Acidic or alkaline, rich or infertile, boxwood trees tolerate a variety of soils. The only essential soil condition for healthy boxwood is good drainage – these plants cannot tolerate wet feet! Modify organic matter or a Burmese plant soil to improve drainage.

Avoid wet areas such as random or landscape along the bottom. Boxwood is usually planted in pots. Be sure to choose a container with excellent drainage to avoid root diseases

BOXWOOD WINTER PROTECTION

Boxwood leaves can turn yellow-orange red-brown in winter due to dry winds, snow and intense sunlight – this is a problem called tanning. In winter baby gems advanced strands like boxwood keep the color good but some protection can go a long way in preventing tanning.

Protection from winter winds is essential to limit tanning. If the planting site does not provide protection, burlap wrappers or windbreaks can be used to protect the leaves.

Also, water the plants before freezing the temperature to reduce tanning. Keep the roots isolated throughout the fall and winter and preserve soil moisture while maintaining a three-inch mole layer.

HOW TO MANAGE BOXWOOD PEST AND DISEASES

Boxwood Anxiously grows plants with very few insect or disease related problems. Most can be prevented with primary care.

HOW TO MANAGE BOXWOOD PEST AND DISEASES
HOW TO MANAGE BOXWOOD PEST AND DISEASES
Insects Pest and management

There are a number of insect pests that attack boxwood shrubs, many of which are the only exclusive ones for this type of plant.

Leafminers

Boxwood leafminer (Monarthropalpus flavus) is the most dangerous pest that can be a threat to the health of this plant. It can cause fatal damage, resulting in colorless and colorless.

Technically these pests can be controlled by planting resistant varieties including a small fly, mostly Japanese species, or using pesticides.

Boxwood Mites

Eurytetranychus buxi according to the facts is a spider mite. It feeds on the underside of the leaves and causes yellow and white spots.

It usually attacks B semperverine, the smaller-blank species are usually less susceptible. Be careful not to use too high a nitrogen fertilizer, as it can increase the frequency of mite infections.

If they are present, prevent a strong explosion from their hose or use garden oil.

PSYLLIDS

Caxopsylla buxi sometimes known as psylla buxi, is less deadly than the two mentioned insects but it can cause cosmetic damage to your plant – such as the poor growth of figs and sugar.

It often attacks American boxwood, defeating it in the spring after overwintering the ground at the beginning of the year. You need to use pesticides to get rid of it.

Mealybugs

Several species of mealybugs in the pseudococcidae family are difficult to control by pesticides but you can get rid of them in a powerful blast from pesticide soap or hose.

Insects Pest and management
Insects Pest and management

Not only do they destroy your boxwood plants by storing their energy while feeding, but mylebugs also excrete beeswax, a substance that attracts ants and can lead to dry mold.

Parasitic Nematodes

There are several types of nematodes that attack boxwood plants and these pests can cause stunted growth.

To prevent them from affecting the health of your plant, grow resistant varieties such as B. sempervirens and adapt to care with regular application of water, marijuana and fertilizer.

Scale

Scales of different species, a sucking insect in the Cocoidia family, which can be uncommon leaf spots, can attack your boxwood shrubs.

Insects look like small white stems and when you remove them from your plants you will see green spots that cannot be moved in their place.

Fortunately, these pests do not usually kill the plant and usually do not cause long-term effects beyond cosmetic damage to the surface. If your plants are suffering from an insect problem, you can prune the areas that have been affected.

Boxwood Disease and Management

Most diseases of Bokas species can be prevented and treated by following good water supply and garden hygiene.

Here are some of the most common offenders:

Boxwood Blight

Boxwood blight is caused by the fungal pathogens such as Neonectria pseudonaviculatum and Cylindrocladium pseudonavitulatum.

In the lower part of the fungus, brown spots and wings form lesions due to the fungus F

Blighs can kill young trees or plants, of which small-hollow boxwood is the most sensitive.

You can limit the spread of the disease by cleaning all your garden tools and destroying infected tree parts.

Make sure your plants are thin and properly spaced for good air circulation and use fungicides if necessary.

Leaf burn

The leaves of your boxwood turn red or yellow and fall off prematurely. This physiological disorder is caused by water pressure and low temperatures.

Plant your shrubs in a place protected from the wind and make sure they are well watered during drought.

Leaf Spot

Leaf stains result in yellowing of the leaves and staining with black.

A fungal disease caused by Macrofoma Candoli, it can be prevented by protecting your plants from wind and salt sprays.

HOW TO PRUNE AND MAINTAIN BOXWOOD

Boxwood shrubs branch should be prune to enhance growth and maintain the desired size.

The best time to prune is the onset of winter. Prune only a small amount, cut off more than a third of the plant at a time.

If more extensive pruning is needed – for example, if your plant is infected with a disease – you should start cutting large branches just on one side of the tree and taking half of them the following year.

This will prevent the plant from exerting additional pressure when it is already trying to recover from another event or situation.

HOW TO CARE FOR BOXWOOD
HOW TO CARE FOR BOXWOOD

You can also thin your boxwood shrubs to improve air circulation. This should be done once a year at all times rather than when the temperature is frozen.

Mulching is a good idea for most trees. Adding about one to two inches of organic marigolds like pipe needles, composite leaves, or pine bark will help keep the soil moist and fertile in the drip line.

Simply apply mulch against the stems, which can rot.

HOW TO HEDGE YOUR BETS WITH BOXWOOD

If you are searching for an ornamental shrub that can grow as a small tree and serve as hedge, a border or yes – to form a hedge then you have to consider growing boxwood.

This plant is hardy, easy to grow and interested in gardening in all seasons.

Have you grown a boxwood shrub before? Do you increase their hedges, top level or any other way? Let us know in the comments section below, and feel free to ask any questions you may have about this elegant shrub growth.

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.